Bill Proposed to Introduce Red-Light Cameras at Intersections in Kentucky

Currently, the only way a driver will be fined for running a red light in the Bluegrass is if someone actually sees them doing it.

Posted: Dec 2, 2021 11:22 PM
Updated: Dec 2, 2021 11:37 PM

Kentuckians might want to reconsider risking that yellow in the future because if they end up crossing an intersection when the light turns red, the chances of paying the price could be going up.

"I think it'll help," Henderson resident Kim Childers said. "We'd have the green light for a few seconds and there'd be a tractor-trailer fly right through. There've been people hit in front of me and I've almost gotten hit myself a time or two."

A Kentucky legislator is now hoping to crack down on drivers who run red lights.

Senator Reggie Thomas, (D)-District 13, pre-filed a bill that could make it legal for red-light runners to be ticketed through the use of traffic cameras.

"It's designed primarily to protect people's property, people walking on the street, even children who might be outside, who play near where stoplights are," Sen. Thomas said.

Currently, the only way a driver will be fined for running a red light in the Bluegrass is if someone actually sees them doing it. The proposed bill as it stands would allow for cameras to snap a photo of a car's license plate and bill the owner a $50 citation.

"I've been through a lot of states that have had them; my dad has gotten tickets from them, you know," Angela Albey said.

Not everyone is in favor of the digital ticketing system.

Albey is a Tri-State mom who drives between Indiana and Kentucky every day. She worries the cost would outweigh the benefit.

"How are they going to get paid for? By us or by the other little agencies that they've got going?" Albey said. "So, I mean that's a big issue too, I guarantee, for most Kentuckians."

If the bill were to pass, the Commonwealth would be the 23rd state to permit the use of red-light cameras.

"They buckle down on tickets and all that anyways already," said Andrea Albey.

But whether in favor, like Childers.

"I think they need to go up now because there have been too many close calls," she said.

Or opposed, like Albey.

"I really don't feel like it's useful, no," she said.

The bill has a long way to go. It's in the conceptual stage and will be considered in the upcoming legislative session.

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It was another cool, though overall pleasant day across the Tri-State - after only seeing temperatures dive as low as 22° early this morning, peak temperatures ended up climbing a few degrees higher than Thursday's; that being said, Evansville’s high temperature of 27° Was still 15° below average for this time of the year. As for the evening ahead, temperatures will gradually fall for 23° around dinner time back down to 19° by10 PM. A weak northerly wind flow most of the night paired with our crystal clear skies will cause temperatures to of fall back down into the mid to low teens once again - Evansville's anticipated low temperature of 12° will mark or coolest since the morning of January 7th.
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