How does Weather Impact the Harvest Season?

Storm Team 44 is aware of the responsibility we have to the agriculture community to provide the most accurate forecast, especially this time of the year. Check out some of the reasons why weather plays an integral role in a good or bad harvest season.

Posted: Sep 13, 2021 3:26 PM

Harvest season is in full swing, and many Tri-Staters are looking forward to a great quality yield.

Unlike the growing season, which is dependent on rainy days and warmer afternoons, long stretches of drier weather is what many growers want for a successful return.

Storm Team 44  is aware of the responsibility we have to the agriculture community to provide the most accurate forecast, especially this time of the year. Here are some of the reasons why weather plays an integral role in a good or bad harvest season.

In the lower Midwest, we have acres upon acres of corn and soybean fields. According to the USDA, the state of Indiana contributes about 7% of the country's corn and soybean production annually. Between mid-September and late November is the ideal harvesting periods for both crops.

Thanks to the advancement of technology, farmers are now able to use machines like combine harvesters. That machine does three things at once: cuts and gathers the crop; separates the edible parts, and moves the unwanted stalks and husks away from the grains. A soggy field created by rainfall will overwhelm the machine's ability to navigate and ultimately result in slow production.

Not only will the tools and equipment take a hit, but the actual crop can also be impacted due to excessive rainfall events. Heavy showers, or worse yet hailstones and strong winds can strip from the crops.

The absolute worst scenario is to have a rainy autumn with an early frost, followed by a snowy or wet winter. This can further complicate seeding and the growing season for next year’s crop. This was an unfortunate reality for many growers in the Midwest in the spring of 2011.

Luckily, the Tri-State usually experiences the driest months in the fall season. We will continue to keep you updated with any major changes to the forecast.

Evansville
Mostly Cloudy
80° wxIcon
Hi: 85° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 83°
Owensboro
Cloudy
81° wxIcon
Hi: 84° Lo: 67°
Feels Like: 84°
Princeton
Partly Cloudy
86° wxIcon
Hi: 86° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 89°
Madisonville
Cloudy
81° wxIcon
Hi: 82° Lo: 66°
Feels Like: 84°
Jasper
Partly Cloudy
81° wxIcon
Hi: 86° Lo: 65°
Feels Like: 84°
Sure, yesterday's passing cold front and lingering rainfall made for a cooler-than average, fall-like day across the Tri-State - today on the other hand, was a bit more summer-like. The core of high pressure flowing in behind that cold front has now settled to our east and is actively pumping southerly winds, more heat and gulf humidity back into the Ohio valley. As a result, temperatures pushed back into the mid 80s for the majority of the region; the added humidity even made it feel a few degrees hotter as well. As for the rest of the evening, conditions will remain dry with temperatures gradually falling from 80° around dinnertime into the mid to low 70s by 10PM. The combination of added cloud cover overnight and those aforementioned southerly winds will help keep temperatures mild tonight - we'll only dip as low as 67° early Friday morning in the River City.
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