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Why Does Snow Linger with Warmer Temperatures?

Here are the reasons why snow melt can be a long process.

Posted: Feb 22, 2021 2:02 PM
Updated: Feb 24, 2021 11:35 AM

The rounds of snow and ice experienced over the past couple of weeks have left many communities in the Tri State in a slushy mess. Although the plows have cleared through most streets, many front yards and retail parking lots continue to have lumps of snow scattered throughout. Even as temperatures rise beyond the freezing-mark, eye sores of dirty snow and ice are still seen, why is that?

The progression of melting snow works in two phases. One phase is actually warming the snow and ice to 32 degrees. Multiple external variables could limit this; such as the diurnal sun angle, cloud coverage and ground temperatures (grassy areas vs black pavement). The second phase is a called Latent Heat of Fusion. This refers to energy transferred between a body and its surroundings, defined by the occurrence or non-occurrence of temperature change; they depend on the properties of the body. Simply put, the larger the mass of snow is, the longer it will take to melt. One real-world example is observing how quickly a single cube of ice melts compared to a bag of ice under the same condition. The larger mounds of snow left behind from plowing will take much longer to melt and evaporate compared to lesser amounts.

If you are completely fed up with seeing snow altogether, our sunny weather this week will work in your favor. One thing to highlight is albedo. Albedo is the measurement of how reflective an object is on a scale of 1 to 100. Fresh snowfall has one of the highest albedo ratings of 99. However, due to the salt, sand and general road traffic the fresh snow has turned into lumps of dirty snow which lowers its albedo level. A lower albedo level increases the chance for the leftover snow to absorb and trap radiation from the sun which will allow for faster melting.

The forecast in the coming days also calls for breezy and warmer conditions which will enable even more rapid evaporation and melting.

Evansville
Clear
50° wxIcon
Hi: 73° Lo: 45°
Feels Like: 50°
Owensboro
Clear
52° wxIcon
Hi: 74° Lo: 46°
Feels Like: 52°
Princeton
Clear
48° wxIcon
Hi: 72° Lo: 45°
Feels Like: 48°
Madisonville
Clear
50° wxIcon
Hi: 75° Lo: 46°
Feels Like: 50°
Jasper
Clear
49° wxIcon
Hi: 72° Lo: 43°
Feels Like: 49°
Just another day in paradise. Temperatures surged back into the low 70's for the first time in a week and a half and with southerly winds finally returning to the region, more warmth is on the way for the Tri-State. In fact, this evening looks nothing short of absolutely gorgeous across the area - by dinnertime we'll have fallen back down to 71°, but only as low as 58° by 10PM. So, if you have plans out and about this evening, all you may need will be a sweatshirt. We'll also remain relatively mild early Saturday morning, especially when you compare Saturday morning's anticipated low of 48° to previous mornings earlier in the week. Brrr.
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